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Elbow Conditions

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

Lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as tennis elbow, is a painful condition involving the tendons that attach to the bone on the outside of the elbow. The muscle involved in this condition helps to extend and stabilize the wrist. With lateral epicondylitis, there is degeneration of the tendon’s attachment, weakening the anchor site and placing greater stress on the area.

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)

Golfer's Elbow, medial epicondylitis, is a type of cumulative trauma injury and occurs when the tendons that attach to the inner elbow degenerate. Tendons do not stretch easily and are vulnerable to degeneration during repetitive motions, such as those used during a golf swing or work activities. Golfer's Elbow involves the common flexor tendon that connects flexor forearm muscles to the inner (medial) side of the elbow bone (epicondyle).

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition caused by pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow. When a nerve is compressed, it cannot function properly. The Ulnar Nerve carries signals for sensation in one half of our ring finger and our small finger and to our muscles that perform fine hand movements. Individuals with Cubital Tunnel Syndrome have difficulty handling objects and performing gripping motions. Individuals may feel pain, numbness, and a “tingly” sensation.

Elbow Pain

Elbow Pain

The elbow is a hinge joint made up of 3 bones – humerus, radius and ulna. The bones are held together by ligaments to provide stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons move the bones around each other and help in performing various activities. Nerves pass through the joint. Damage to these structures can cause elbow pain

Fractures of the Elbow

Fractures of the Elbow

When you bend your elbow, you can easily feel its tip, a bony prominence called the olecranon that extends from one of the lower arm bones (the ulna). It is positioned directly under the skin of the elbow, without much protection from muscles or other soft tissues.

Elbow Arthritis

Elbow Arthritis

Although the elbows are not weight-bearing joints, they are considered to be most important for the functioning of the upper limbs. Hence, even minor trauma or disease affecting the elbow may cause pain and limit the movements of the upper limbs. Arthritis is one of the common disease conditions affecting the elbow joint.

Elbow Bursitis

Elbow Bursitis

The olecranon bursa, a flat, slippery sac between the loose skin and the bones of the elbow, is located at the tip of the elbow. The bursa allows the skin to move freely over the underlying bone. A condition known as bursitis develops if the bursa becomes irritated or inflamed.

Throwing Injuries

Throwing Injuries

With the start of the baseball and softball seasons each spring, our SBO orthopaedic surgeons frequently see an increase in elbow problems in young ball players. A common elbow problem in these children is medial apoxphysitis, commonly referred to as Little Leaguer's elbow.

  • University of Notre Dame
  • Saint Joseph Health System
  • Beacon Health System
  •  American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • The American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics
  • American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons
  • American Board of Medical Specialties
  • American Board of Medical Specialties
  • American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society
  • American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
  • North American Spine Society
  • American Society for Surgery of the Hand
  • American Academy of Physician Assistants
  • Zimmer Biomet
  • Stryker Corporation
  • Arthrex
  • Breg
  • Smith+Nephew
  • DePuy Synthes