We have implemented safery measures to protect the health of our patients and staff, while enabling us to continue to provide high-quality orthopedic care.

To learn more about our respose to COVID-19, click here.

Hip Procedures

Total Hip Replacement

Total Hip Replacement

Total hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the damaged cartilage and bone is removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. The hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints, located between the thighbone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum). It is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular cartilage which acts as a cushion and enables smooth movements of the joint.

Anterior Hip Replacement

Anterior Hip Replacement

Over the past few years, there have been great advances in the treatment options, implants, and minimally invasive techniques. The latest technique in joint replacement such as anterior hip replacement has resulted in a dramatic improvement in outcome.

Revision Hip Replacement

Revision Hip Replacement

Revision hip replacement is a complex surgical procedure in which all or part of a previously implanted hip-joint is replaced with a new artificial hip-joint. Total hip replacement surgery is an option to relieve severe arthritis pain that limits your daily activities. During total hip replacement, the damaged cartilage and bone is removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. At times, hip replacement implants can wear out for various reasons and may need to be replaced with the help of a surgical procedure known as revision hip replacement surgery.

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

Traditionally, total hip replacement will be performed through a 10–12-inch-long incision made on the side of the hip. A minimally invasive approach has been developed in recent years where surgery is performed through one or two smaller incisions rather than the single long incision as in the traditional approach. Advantages of the newer approach are lesser muscle dissection, minimal pain, quicker recovery, and faster rehabilitation.

Femur Fracture Fixation

Femur Fracture Fixation

The femur or thighbone is the longest and strongest bone in the body, connecting the hip to the knee. A femur fracture is a break in the femur.

Types

  • Proximal femur fracture
  • Femoral shaft fracture
  • Distal femur fracture

Hip Hemiarthroplasty

Hip Hemiarthroplasty

The hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints and is the point where the thighbone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum) unite. It is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular cartilage that cushions and enables smooth movements of the joint.

Nonsurgical Treatment for the Hip

Nonsurgical Treatment for the Hip

The key to keeping a hip problem at bay is to stay relatively active and to eat right. The most recent government report notes that 56 percent of Americans are overweight. This is bad news for our hips and knees.

Surgical Options for the Hip

Surgical Options for the Hip

Over time, the impact of joint injury, arthritis, or excessive body weight can erode the hip joint. Arthritis can be an inherited disease process that appears with age. One risk factor that is under the control of the person is their body weight. Excessive body weight can wear out the normal knee and hip joints which were never intended to carry a human that is morbidly obese.

  • University of Notre Dame
  • Saint Joseph Health System
  • Beacon Health System
  •  American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • The American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedics
  • American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons
  • American Board of Medical Specialties
  • American Board of Medical Specialties
  • American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society
  • American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
  • North American Spine Society
  • American Society for Surgery of the Hand
  • American Academy of Physician Assistants
  • Zimmer Biomet
  • Stryker Corporation
  • Arthrex
  • Breg
  • Smith+Nephew
  • DePuy Synthes